Differences Between Surrogacy Pregnancy and Traditional Pregnancy

If you’re finding a simple answer to the difference between the two, it’s here 👇

Traditional Pregnancy: In a traditional pregnancy, the woman carrying the baby is also the biological mother. The pregnancy occurs through natural conception, where sperm fertilizes an egg within the woman’s reproductive system.

Surrogacy Pregnancy: In surrogacy, the woman carrying the baby (the surrogate) is not necessarily the biological mother. The embryo may be created using the intended parent’s genetic material or that of donors and then implanted into the surrogate’s uterus through in vitro fertilization (IVF).

Surrogacy pregnancy and traditional pregnancy (also known as gestational pregnancy) have distinct differences. Here are some key differences between the two:

#1. Biological Connection

Traditional Pregnancy The woman carrying the baby is genetically related to the child. The baby shares genetic material with both the mother and the father.

However, in a surrogate pregnancy, the surrogate may not have a genetic connection to the baby. The genetic material can come from the intended parents or donors, depending on the arrangement.

#2. Medical Procedures

In surrogacy Pregnancy, in vitro fertilization (IVF) is used to create an embryo using the intended mother’s (or donor’s) egg and the intended father’s (or donor’s) sperm, which is then transferred to the surrogate. Traditional Pregnancy occurs through natural insemination (unprotected sexual intercourse while ovulating). No specialized treatment or procedures are required, but regular checkups.

Legal and Emotional Considerations

Traditional Pregnancy: The legal and emotional aspects of parenthood are typically straightforward, with the woman carrying the baby being recognized as the legal mother.

Surrogacy Pregnancy: Everyone experiences emotional ups and downs during pregnancy, but surrogacy may add another layer of stress. Legal contracts are frequently used in surrogacy arrangements to establish parental rights. Given that the surrogate may or may not play a continuing role in the child’s life after birth, there may be intricate emotional considerations.

In surrogacy pregnancies, legal agreements are a necessary element since they help:

  • All parties involved to understand and accept the responsibilities, expectations,  exchange. 
  • The general nature of the relationship between intended parents and surrogate mothers.

Bonding with Baby

community support

Western research has shown that surrogates do not experience long-term psychological damage. According to one study, expectant moms and surrogates have stronger bonds with the fetus. Therefore, in a traditional pregnancy, the intended parents don’t need to put in as much work because the bond with the child is already established. However, if surrogacy is involved, the intended parents must put in more work to develop that attachment.

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How can intended parents better bond with a surrogate baby?

1. Participate in the Pregnancy

It is best to try and be as involved in the pregnancy as you can be, spending the entire time with the surrogate. This entails spending time with them outside of hospital stays and accompanying them to doctor’s appointments. Although you did not carry the child yourself, this encourages the surrogate to keep you informed and gives you the impression that you were a part of the pregnancy, which strengthens your bond with the child after it is born.

2. Speak with your child before the birth

When you meet your surrogate, don’t be scared to engage in conversation with the infant. Hearing their parents’ voices in vitro plays a significant role in the bond between a mother and child. Provide your infant with as many opportunities as you can for them to hear your voice.

talking to the body

3. Talk to Your Baby After They Are Born

You should talk to your baby as much as possible after they are born in addition to before they are born. The advantages of spending time conversing with your child cannot be emphasized.

4. Establish Physical Contact

Making as much physical contact as you can after the baby is born is essential to building a strong bond. While bathing, feeding, and changing your child will inevitably lead to physical contact, many parents also use a technique called “kangaroo care.”

5. Respond to Your Baby’s Needs

Being a great parent starts with paying attention to your child and meeting their needs. Particularly if you’re a first-time parent, you might initially feel overwhelmed by the new baby, but you pick things up fast. Even though you might not be able to predict your baby’s needs at first, the more you observe them, the more you will learn about them.

6. Make the Most of Feeding Time

Being a great parent starts with paying attention to your child and meeting their needs. Particularly if you’re a first-time parent, you might initially feel overwhelmed by the new baby, but you pick things up fast. Even though you might not be able to predict your baby’s needs at first, the more you observe them, the more you will learn about them.

7. Be Affectionate

After bringing your baby home, you will undoubtedly find yourself holding them a lot—for feeding, comforting, or just to appreciate them for the tiny miracles they are. The baby will feel much closer to you after this contact because they can feel and hear your heartbeat.

Conclusion

It’s important to note that surrogacy arrangements can vary, and the level of involvement, compensation, and the role of the surrogate can be defined by legal agreements and individual preferences. The choice between traditional pregnancy and surrogacy often depends on the specific circumstances and needs of the individuals involved.

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Written by David
I work daily to make surrogacy available to as many intended parents, surrogate mothers and egg donors around the world as possible.

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